COVID-19 VACCINE

We ask for your patience as we are waiting to receive our next allotment of COVID-19 vaccines. We do not know how many doses or which vaccine we will receive next from the government. Unfortunately, we do not get to pick the type of vaccine we receive so we could get the Moderna, Pfizer or Johnson & Johnson. We will continue to provide everyone with updates through our social media and website when we know when and what we will be receiving next. 

 

If you would like to receive updates, please complete the form below to join our waitlist. Once we receive our next supply, we will call you directly to schedule your vaccination appointment. We ask for your understanding as we schedule everyone based on the order they are on the waitlist (date and time submitted). We will continue to make the vaccine available to priority patients and community members so please specify in the comment section if you are an essential worker, first responder, healthcare worker, educator or daycare worker, person with a chronic condition, or resident of a care facility or group setting.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Please read the FAQs below by selecting the different categories - about getting vaccinated, about Covid-19 vaccines and vaccine distribution. 

Getting Vaccinated

Who can be vaccinated now?


Front-line healthcare workers and residents at long-term care facilities (called Phase 1A) plus people over 65 or with a chronic medical condition that puts them at increased risk for severe illness from COVID‑19 (called Phase 1B) are currently eligible to receive the COVID‑19 vaccine. Phase 1B recipients include:

  • People 65 years of age and older
  • People 16 years of age and older with at least one chronic medical condition that puts them at increased risk for severe illness from the virus that causes COVID-19, such as but not limited to:

    • Cancer

    • Chronic kidney disease

    • COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)

    • Down Syndrome

    • Heart conditions, such as heart failure, coronary artery disease or cardiomyopathies

    • Solid organ transplantation

    • Obesity and severe obesity (body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or higher)

    • Pregnancy

    • Sickle cell disease

    • Type 2 diabetes mellitus




What steps should I follow to be vaccinated?


Please fill out our waiting list form above, and we will contact you when it's time to schedule your appointment. An appointment must be scheduled. We will not accept walk-in patients.




What will I need to bring?


1) Face mask 2) Health insurance card, if you are insured 3) Driver’s license or social security card 4) Health care workers should bring an employer-issued badge or identification card 5) Cell phone




How will I know when it's my time to be vaccinated?


We are continuously updating information as it becomes available. If you have filled our waitlist form, we will contact you directly, when it's time to schedule your appointment. Please be aware that it may be several weeks before you receive a phone call to schedule your appointment.




Which Covid-19 vaccine will you offer?


We are offering Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine. The FDA has authorized the emergency use of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine to prevent COVID-19 in individuals 18 years of age and older under an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA).




What are the ingredients in the Moderna Covid-19 Vaccine?


The Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine contains the following ingredients: messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA), lipids (SM-102, polyethylene glycol [PEG] 2000 dimyristoyl glycerol [DMG], cholesterol, and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine [DSPC]), tromethamine, tromethamine hydrochloride, acetic acid, sodium acetate, and sucrose.




Does the vaccine cost anything?


There is no cost to be vaccinated against COVID-19. Those with insurance should bring their prescriptions insurance information with them for billing of the administration fee. Those without insurance will need to provide their driver’s license.




If I’m eligible for vaccine now, how do I get one?


From the Texas Department of State Health Services: If you are in Phase 1A or 1B, you have two options to get the vaccine: you can get vaccinated at a large vaccine hub or a local vaccine provider. Beginning in January, Texas established large vaccination sites or hubs around the state. The goal of these hubs is to provide more people the vaccine and a simpler way to sign up for an appointment. Please check the COVID‑19 Vaccination Hub Providers page to find a hub near you and learn how to register. Remember, vaccine supply is still limited in Texas, even though more arrives each week. Please note:

  • Do not show up at a vaccine hub without first signing up or checking the provider’s instructions for scheduling.
  • Hub providers may already have long waiting lists or may be no longer accepting appointments for the week.
  • Each hub’s registration process is different, so look carefully at the hub’s registration site for details.
    • Depending on the provider, you may be placed on a waiting list and/or may be contacted (phone, email, or text) when vaccines become available.

Another option is to check with a vaccine provider near you. Local vaccine providers, like pharmacies, may have vaccine available. Use the Texas COVID‑19 Vaccine Availability Map to find a provider near you with vaccine available. Check the provider’s website for how to best sign up for a vaccine. Remember:
  • Do not show up at a hospital or clinic looking for vaccine.
  • Instead please check their website for information about vaccine availability and/or a wait list.
  • Call only if the website doesn’t answer your questions.
Thank you for your patience as Texas receives more vaccine every week.




Do I have to get the second dose from the same location I got the first dose?


No, you do not have to get your second dose from the same location as you got the first dose. Providers should receive second doses for those who received their first dose. However, if you need to locate a second dose, be sure it’s from the same manufacturer and after the recommended dose interval. For more information, refer to the vaccination materials you received from your provider when you received your first dose. Those may include a vaccination fact sheet and/or record card.




If I'm unable to get the second dose within the recommended timeframe, do I have to start all over?


No, you do not have to start all over. Missing the suggested interval delays full protection. But you can still get the second dose later if you have difficulty getting it within the recommended time. Just don’t get it earlier than recommended. According to CDC, if you need help scheduling your vaccine appointment for your second shot, contact the location that set up your appointment for assistance. Both COVID-19 mRNA vaccines will need two shots to get the most protection. The timing between your first and second shot depends on which vaccine you received. You should get your second shot:

  • for the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine: 3 weeks (or 21 days) after your first shot;
  • for the Moderna vaccine: 1 month (or 28 days) after your first shot.
You should get your second shot as close to the recommended 3-week or 1-month interval as possible. However, there is no maximum interval between the first and second doses for either vaccine. You should not get the second dose earlier than the recommended interval. For more information, visit the What to Expect after Getting a COVID‑19 Vaccine section of the CDC website. For information about the Pfizer vaccine, visit the Information about the Pfizer-BioNtech COVID-19 Vaccine section of the CDC website. For information about the Moderna vaccine, visit the Information about the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine section of the CDC website.




How long after I get the COVID-19 vaccine before I am protected?


For the two-dose vaccines, the process of getting fully vaccinated takes over a month in total. You will get full protection from the vaccine usually 1–2 weeks after getting your second dose. Talk to a healthcare provider to get information specific to your COVID-19 vaccine.




Can I get the COVID-19 vaccine if I have COVID-19?


People who currently have COVID-19 should not be vaccinated while being sick. Talk to your healthcare provider about the timing of your vaccination(s) if you have been sick with COVID-19.




Can I just take one of the two doses?


For all but one of the COVID-19 vaccines currently in development, you will need two shots for full protection. You will need two doses from the same manufacturer, spaced 21 or 28 days apart, depending on the vaccine manufacturer. You will get full protection from the vaccine usually 1–2 weeks after getting your second dose. Get the second shot even if you have side effects from the first shot, unless the vaccination provider or your healthcare provider tells you not to get the shot. When you get the vaccine, you will receive information about what kind of vaccine you got and when you need to come back for your second dose. You can register and use the new V-safe After Vaccination Health Checker to receive health check-ins after you receive a COVID-19 vaccination, as well as reminders to get your second dose if you need one. If you choose to get only one dose, the amount of protection you may have is not known.





About Covid-19 Vaccines

Which lasts longer, immunity after getting Covid-19 or protection from Covid-19 Vaccines?


The protection someone gains from having an infection (called “natural immunity”) varies depending on the disease, and it varies from person to person. Because this virus is new, we don’t know how long natural immunity might last. Current evidence suggests that getting the virus again (reinfection) is uncommon in the 90 days after the first infection with the virus that causes COVID-19. We won’t know how long immunity lasts after vaccination until we have more data on how well COVID-19 vaccines work in real-world conditions. Experts are working to learn more about both natural immunity and vaccine-induced immunity. CDC will keep the public informed as new evidence becomes available.




Will we ever achieve “herd immunity” in Texas?


Experts are still learning about what percentage of Texans would need to be vaccinated to achieve herd immunity. This term describes when enough people have protection, either from a previous infection or from vaccination, that it is unlikely a virus or bacteria can spread between people in a community and cause disease. The percentage needed to reach herd immunity varies by disease. CDC and DSHS will keep the public informed as more information becomes available.




If I have already had Covid-19 and recovered, do I still need to get vaccinated with a Covid-19 vaccine?


Yes. Due to the severe health risks associated with COVID-19 and the fact that reinfection with COVID-19 is possible, you should be vaccinated regardless of whether you already had COVID-19 infection. If you were treated for COVID-19 symptoms with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma, you should wait 90 days before getting a COVID-19 vaccine. Talk to your doctor if you are unsure what treatments you received or if you have more questions about getting a COVID-19 vaccine. Experts do not yet know how long someone is protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. The immunity someone gains from having an infection, called “natural immunity,” varies from person to person. It is rare for someone who has had COVID-19 to get infected again. It also is uncommon for people who do get COVID-19 again to get it within 90 days of when they recovered from their first infection. We won’t know how long immunity produced by vaccination lasts until we have more data on how well the vaccines work. Both natural immunity and vaccine-induced immunity are important aspects of COVID-19 that experts are working to learn more about, and CDC will keep the public informed as new evidence becomes available.




Do I need to wear a mask and avoid close contact with others if I have gotten 2 doses of the vaccine?


Yes. Not enough information is currently available to say if or when CDC will stop recommending that people wear masks and avoid close contact with others to help prevent the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19. Experts need to understand more about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide in real-world conditions before making that decision. Other factors, including how many people get vaccinated and how the virus is spreading in communities, will also affect this decision. We also don’t yet know whether getting a COVID-19 vaccine will prevent you from spreading the virus that causes COVID-19 to other people, even if you don’t get sick yourself. CDC will continue to update this page as we learn more. While experts learn more about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide under real-life conditions, it will be important for everyone to continue using all the tools available to help stop this pandemic. To protect yourself and others, follow these recommendations:

  • Wear a mask over your nose and mouth
  • Stay at least 6 feet away from others
  • Avoid crowds
  • Avoid poorly ventilated spaces
  • Wash your hands often
Together, COVID-19 vaccination and following CDC’s recommendations for how to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from getting and spreading COVID-19.




How many shots of the Covid-19 vaccine will be needed?


The currently authorized vaccines to prevent COVID-19 in the United States require 2 shots to get the most protection:

  • Pfizer-BioNTech doses should be given 3 weeks (21 days) apart
  • Moderna doses should be given 1 month (28 days) apart
You should get your second shot as close to the recommended 3-week or 1-month interval as possible. However, there is no maximum interval between the first and second doses for either vaccine. You should not get the second dose earlier than the recommended interval. Additional COVID-19 vaccines are in Phase 3 clinical trials. Learn more about the different COVID-19 vaccines.




Can I get a Covid-19 vaccine at the same time as another vaccine?


Wait at least 14 days before getting any other vaccine, including a flu or shingles vaccine, if you get your COVID-19 vaccine first,. And if you get another vaccine first, wait at least 14 days before getting your COVID-19 vaccine. If a COVID-19 vaccine is inadvertently given within 14 days of another vaccine, you do not need to restart the COVID-19 vaccine series; you should still complete the series on schedule. When more data are available on the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines administered simultaneously with other vaccines, CDC may update this recommendation. this recommendation may be updated.




How are the Covid-19 vaccines different from other vaccines?


Different types of vaccines work in different ways to offer protection. But every type of vaccine works by teaching our bodies how to make cells that trigger an immune response. That immune response, which produces antibodies, is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies. Currently, there are three main types of COVID-19 vaccines that are or soon will be undergoing large-scale (Phase 3) clinical trials in the United States:

  • mRNA vaccines
  • Protein subunit vaccines
  • Vector vaccines
COVID-19 vaccines do not use the live virus and cannot give you COVID-19. The vaccine does not alter your DNA. COVID-19 vaccination will help protect you by creating an immune response without having to experience sickness. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work on the Understanding How COVID-19 Vaccines Work section of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website.




How effective will the vaccine be against COVID-19, and for how long?


Different vaccines are proving to have different efficacy rates. Some manufacturers are reporting 90% to 95% protection at 1–2 weeks after receiving the final dose. At this time, experts do not know how long protection will last or whether a booster shot will be necessary later, after the initial recommended vaccine dose(s). CDC and DSHS will keep the public informed as they learn more.




What are some side effects from the vaccines for COVID-19?


COVID-19 vaccines are associated with a number of side effects, but almost all of them are mild. They include pain and redness at the injection site, fatigue, headache, body aches and even fever. Having symptoms like fever after you get a vaccine is normal and a sign your immune system is building protection against the virus. The side effects from COVID-19 vaccination may feel like flu, but they should go away in a few days. If you get the vaccine and experience severe side effects or ones that do not go away in a couple of days, contact your healthcare provider for further instructions on how to take care of yourself. You can register and use the new V-safe After Vaccination Health Checker to receive health check-ins after you receive a COVID-19 vaccination, as well as reminders to get your second dose if you need one. To learn what side effects to expect and get helpful tips on how to reduce pain and discomfort after your vaccination, visit the What to Expect after Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine section of the CDC website




Does the vaccine react poorly with any medications, or do the prescriptions I'm taking preclude me from being able to get a vaccine?


You will need to check with your healthcare provider about whether your medication will interfere with being vaccinated.




Can a COVID-19 vaccine make me sick with COVID-19?


No. None of the authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines or COVID-19 vaccines currently in development in the United States contain the live virus that causes COVID-19. This means that a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19. There are several different types of vaccines in development. All of them teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are a sign that the body is building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work. It typically takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity (protection against the virus that causes COVID-19) after vaccination. That means it’s possible a person could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and still get sick. This is because the vaccine has not had enough time to provide protection.




After getting a COVID-19 vaccine, will I test positive for COVID-19 on a viral test?


No. Neither the recently authorized and recommended vaccines nor the other COVID-19 vaccines currently in clinical trials in the United States can cause you to test positive on viral tests, which are used to see if you have a current infection.​ If your body develops an immune response—the goal of vaccination—there is a possibility you may test positive on some antibody tests. Antibody tests indicate you had a previous infection and that you may have some level of protection against the virus. Experts are currently looking at how COVID-19 vaccination may affect antibody testing results.




Will a COVID-19 vaccination protect me from getting sick with COVID-19?


Yes. COVID-19 vaccination works by teaching your immune system how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19, and this protects you from getting sick with COVID-19. Being protected from getting sick is important because even though many people with COVID-19 have only a mild illness, others may get a severe illness, have long-term health effects, or even die. There is no way to know how COVID-19 will affect you, even if you don’t have an increased risk of developing severe complications. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work.




Will a COVID-19 vaccine alter my DNA?


No. COVID-19 mRNA vaccines do not change or interact with your DNA in any way. Messenger RNA vaccines—also called mRNA vaccines—are the first COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use in the United States. mRNA vaccines teach our cells how to make a protein that triggers an immune response. The mRNA from a COVID-19 vaccine never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA is kept. This means the mRNA cannot affect or interact with our DNA in any way. Instead, COVID-19 mRNA vaccines work with the body’s natural defenses to safely develop immunity to disease. Learn more about how COVID-19 mRNA vaccines work. ​ At the end of the process, our bodies have learned how to protect against future infection. That immune response and making antibodies is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies.




Is it safe for me to get a COVID-19 vaccine if I would like to have a baby one day?


Yes. People who want to get pregnant in the future may receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Based on current knowledge, experts believe that COVID-19 vaccines are unlikely to pose a risk to a person trying to become pregnant in the short or long term. Scientists study every vaccine carefully for side effects immediately and for years afterward. The COVID-19 vaccines are being studied carefully now and will continue to be studied for many years, similar to other vaccines. The COVID-19 vaccine, like other vaccines, works by training our bodies to develop antibodies to fight against the virus that causes COVID-19, to prevent future illness. There is currently no evidence that antibodies formed from COVID-19 vaccination cause any problems with pregnancy, including the development of the placenta. In addition, there is no evidence suggesting that fertility problems are a side effect of ANY vaccine. People who are trying to become pregnant now or who plan to try in the future may receive the COVID-19 vaccine when it becomes available to them.




Can children get the vaccine, or will they rely on their natural immune system to protect them?


At this time, experts do not know how safe the COVID-19 vaccine is for children. People 16 years old and older are currently eligible to get the vaccine if they are in a priority population.




Can pregnant women get the vaccine?


At this time, experts do not know how safe the COVID-19 vaccine is for people who are pregnant. Data from studies are limited. But experts believe COVID-19 vaccines are unlikely to pose a risk to people who are pregnant. If you are pregnant and are eligible to get the vaccine, you may choose to get vaccinated. Discuss your options and any concerns with your healthcare provider. For more information about COVID-19 vaccines and pregnancy, visit the Vaccination Considerations for People who are Pregnant or Breastfeeding section of the CDC website.





Vaccine Distribution

When will the Covid-19 vaccines be widely available in the United States?


Manufacturing very large quantities of vaccine takes time. The goal is for everyone to be able to easily get a COVID-19 vaccine when large quantities are available for distribution. CDC and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices have published recommendations for which groups should be vaccinated first to help guide decisions about how to distribute limited initial supplies of COVID-19 vaccine. CDC makes recommendations for who should be offered COVID-19 vaccine first, and each state has its own plan to prioritize, distribute, and allocate vaccine. Learn more about how CDC makes vaccine recommendations. As more vaccines are authorized for use in the United States and the supply of vaccines increases, several thousand vaccination locations will be available, such as doctors’ offices, retail pharmacies, hospitals, and federally qualified health centers. Please contact your state health department for more information on its plan for COVID-19 vaccination.




Who decides how many vaccines Texas gets?


CDC determines how many doses of vaccine Texas will receive each week, based on population. Once the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) is notified of the number of doses expected the following week, DSHS staff presents possibilities for vaccine distribution to the Expert Vaccine Allocation Panel (EVAP). The panel makes modifications and recommendations to the Commissioner of Health, who makes the final decision on that week’s distribution.




After Phase 1, who gets the vaccine next and when?


Spring 2021 is the best estimate of when vaccine will be available for the general public, but that may change. It depends on vaccine production and how quickly other vaccines become available. The Expert Vaccine Allocation Panel (EVAP) is considering what criteria could be used for later stages of vaccine distribution. This webpage will be updated when those decisions are completed.




Who decides how to distribute the vaccine in Texas?


In Texas, DSHS distributes the vaccine with the guidance of the EVAP, appointed by the Health Commissioner, Dr. John Hellerstedt.




When will teachers, critical infrastructure workers, essential workers and other front-line workers not included in 1A, be eligible for the vaccine?


Spring 2021 is the best estimate of when vaccine will be available for the general public who are not considered Phase 1B. No specific occupation or group is specifically identified in 1B; however, all occupations will have some individuals who meet the 1B criteria. It depends on vaccine production and how quickly other vaccines become available. Additional information for educators and school staff is available in the Texas Education Agency (TEA) K-12 COVID-19 Vaccine FAQ.